Our hay is made here on our farm

It’s available in conventional small bales and big bales

Our hay is made here on our farm

It’s available in conventional small bales and big bales

Our hay is made here on our farm

It’s available in conventional small bales and big bales

Our hay is made here on our farm

It’s available in conventional small bales and big bales

Hay for horses

‚ÄčAt Old Manor Farm, we cut the same hay fields year after year and have a built up a great deal of experience over the years of how to get the best quality hay from different types of grasses.

The weather has a huge impact on the hay quality and so we have a large range of modern machinery to help us get the hay in the barn quickly when it is ready.

We can supply hay in conventional bales bundled into packs of 21 or big bales of approximately 400kg.

Old Manor Farm haymaking

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Our hay products

Meadow hay

We aim to cut the meadow hay as early in June as the weather permits. This is when the grass is at its best and most nutritious. Some of the meadows have been established since World War I and have a diverse range of grass species. These include Cocksfoot, Timothy, Crested Dogs Tail and Sweet Vernal.
Meadow hay

Timothy hay

We grow Timothy as a pure stand with no ryegrass. Timothy is naturally low in residual sugars and starch and is particularly suited to horses which are prone to laminitis, EMS and cushings. It has a distinctive smell and large seed head. Timothy hay is also very popular for small animals such as rabbits and Guinea pigs and we produce Timothy hay for the pet food market. 

Timothy hay

Ryegrass hay

Our Ryegrass hay is usually from the second or third cut from the same fields as our Ryegrass haylage. Cut in July and August, the crops are usually thinner and take less time to dry than a thick first cut in June. Ryegrass hay is high in energy and protein and is favoured forage for performance and hard work.

Ryegrass hay

Alfalfa/Lucerne hay

Alfalfa, or Lucerne as it is also known in Europe, is a leafy legume plant grown in drought prone areas due to its deep roots. Traditionally Alfalfa hay is imported into the UK from the USA and Canada where it is more commonly grown. We have sown down a small area of Alfalfa for making hay and haylage. It is difficult to make on a large scale as the leaves are very delicate and are easily knocked off the stem if the hay is handled too aggressively before it is baled. Alfalfa hay is high in protein, typically 15-18% compared to 8-10% for meadow hay. It is also low in sugar and is regularly used for racehorses, pregnant and lactating mares and youngstock.

Alfalfa hay